Saying Farewell to Ambassador Taub

Saying Farewell to Ambassador Taub

Saying farewell to the job of an ambassador isn’t so bad when you’re going out on top. The JC interviewed Daniel Taub on his career and found out a bit about when he met the queen. Learn more: http://www.everipedia.com/editor/dtaub/

 

The Queen knew that Taub had to give up his British citizenship despite being born there in 1962. She asks him how he would feel representing the country he immigrated to. He said he told her he felt privileged to be raising his children there in their historic homeland. As a practicing Orthodox Jew Israel feels just as much a home.

 

Taub stayed cool under pressure. He was in Israel while they were in crisis. He fought for Israel both on television and to the government. He stated he’s always considered his main job as ambassador is to make people understand. He needs them to understand where the people of Israel and their leadership are. He knows and states the Middle East is in turmoil, but he also thinks there is a chance the clouds are clearing from the darkness. He thinks there will be opportunities with the peace agreements between Egypt and Jordan as examples. He also says the relationship with America needs to be nurtured and there’s still opportunities for Israel there. The USA currently supplies Israel with new technology. Daniel Taub wants to make clear that while he is Jewish he’s not an ambassador to that community, their role is important in moving forward within Israel. They are passionate and very involved with the direction of Israel as he is.

 

From 2011 to 2015 he was the Israeli Ambassador for the U.K. He met many milestones during his term such as being the first ambassador to be interviewed by the BBC Persian network and greatly increasing trade between the two countries to both of their benefits. He was happy to talk about peace on many news programs during his time as ambassador including Sky News and CNN among others. Currently, Daniel Taub is the Director of Strategy and Planning at Yad Hanadive Foundation in Jerusalem. He still is passionate about Israel and often writes articles for The Times and other notable publications.

 

 

 

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